WIN Christmas Family Hamper

Win a Christmas Family Hamper and Cummins Esky ! Our 40th business year has been the most successful year in our business history because we were able to service more of your Cummins parts requests than ever before.

 

 

 

We thank you for being part of our success, we appreciate your support.

 

If you haven’t yet received one of our 40th year caps, can coolers , cab air freshener or desk pads; please ask us next time you order.

Make sure you enter the draw for our Christmas Family Hamper of goodies displayed in a Cummins ISX style Waeco Esky, simply by purchasing any part between now and Christmas.

The more parts you purchase, the more opportunities you have to win !

 

Christmas Opening Hours

We will operate from 8am to 4pm on Christmas Eve 24th December. We will close Christmas and Boxing Days, and reopen Thursday 27th from 8am to 4pm, 8am to 4pm again on Friday 28th, Saturday 29th from 8.30am to 11.30am, and Monday the 31st of December 8am to 4pm.

Have a wonderful Christmas period with those you love, drive safely, and may 2019 be a prosperous and healthy one for us all.

From the management and team at Torquepower.

About Torquepower

CLESSIE CUMMINS INCORPORATES CUMMINS ENGINE COMPANY

It’s not known exactly when, but the first diesel engine that Clessie Cummins saw was probably in 1917 or 1918, and likely made under license from the R.M. Hvid (pronounced Veed) Company. In the early 20th century, a Dutch man named Jan Brons invented a four-cycle, compression-ignition engine and was granted a European patent in 1907. The Brons engine did not use pressurized injection, which would prove to be a technical barrier for practical diesels.

 

Using that engine as a basis, an American named Rasmus Martin Hvid in 1915 patented an “oil injection device” and a “hydrocarbon engine governor.” The first engines built under those patents were made by the Hercules Engine Company of Evansville, Indiana and marketed by Sears-Roebuck for stationary use under the Thermoil brand.

 

Hvid licensed others, including Cummins, to handle any production needs that couldn’t be handled by Hercules. By then William Irwin was an official with the U.S. Department of Commerce, which may have helped in securing the license. Intellectual property in hand, with $10,000 from Irwin, Clessie Cummins incorporated the Cummins Engine Company in Columbus, Indiana in 1919.

 

Cummins produced its first licensed diesel engine, an 8-horsepower stationary unit, the following year. They didn’t sell many, but it brought in enough revenue to stay in business. Cummins worked on improving the performance of the Hvid engine, simultaneously working on his own original diesel designs.

 

It was a roller-coaster startup, with Sears initially ordering thousands of engines, only to return many of them and cancelling the remaining order. Cummins company lore puts the blame on cheap farmers, who bought the engines, used them for a season, then returned them for refunds. A more likely reason is that the Hvid Thermoil engines just didn’t work very well. That’s evidenced by other historical data and by the fact that Clessie Cummins diligently worked to improve them.

With thanks, Ronnie Schreiber, The Truth About Cars.

Torquepower, working hard for 40 years to support the owners and operators of Cummins powered equipment right across Australia and the South Pacific. https://www.torquepower.com.au/

Invictus Athlete is Torquepower Hero

The Invictus Games in Sydney was mind blowing” says para-athlete Steve Fell. “Toronto was my first Invictus Games so it was special, but there were even more teams competing this time, including athletes from non-English speaking countries, like Jordan, Georgia, Estonia, as well as Canada, the USA and Great Britain. Pictured – Steve wears a Canadian Invictus Games shirt, in the spirit of celebration and comradeship, shirts were swapped, and friendships forged.

Steve and his team-mate won their first round of wheelchair tennis, and were subsequently beaten by the USA as Steve’s companion became unwell, going down with pneumonia. Steve then swam the freestyle leg in the 50 metre relay final. The swim teams are made up of two wheelchair athletes and two able bodied swimmers. Steve is proud to have been the last athlete to exit the pool on the last day ! He helped win the first wheelchair basketball game against Canada, and played for a bronze medal against the English team, but they were too good on the day.

“I’m really happy with how I played, and how we all interacted and encouraged each other. Four athletes from each nation were chosen to meet Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, and I was one of them ! The highlight for me was watching all of the Australians compete, as a wheelchair basketball nation we have improved so much. The Homebush stadium in Sydney is great for wheelchair athletes and I was really pleased to try out the new OGO Segway-like wheelchair. It’s a NZ invention, and for half a day I got to fly around in it ! I’d love to have one of them one day !

“I was tired, and my pelvis and back hurt, but the only real injury was to my pride ! I was so involved watching the athletes at one point, my wheelchair toppled over, and 6 top policemen picked me up ! “, he laughs, “ but some good sleep, and now I’m back into it. ”

You can see Steve in his custom built Snap On Truck most days in the Archerfield area. Torquepower is proud to help Steve with Cummins parts and to be a part of his fan club ! Torquepower, celebrating 40 years – 170 Beatty Road, Archerfield 0732778277

https://shopping.torquepower.com.au/#About

 

 

IT’S OUR 40TH YEAR – OUR PEOPLE KNOW SERVICE

IT’S OUR 40TH YEAR – OUR PEOPLE KNOW SERVICE .
Russell Grant spent 22 years retailing floor coverings before he came to Torquepower. “ I had to know service. It’s not easy running a small business. I had to understand stock control and cash flow, and practical, sensible approaches to overcoming problems. We had to be accurate and we needed to despatch products in the most protective and cost-effective way. In short, if a customer wasn’t happy, I had to fix it. “
 
“Here at Torquepower, I pick parts, communicate with transport companies in despatch, carry out parts deliveries and photograph a huge range of parts for our online store. The difference with a smaller business, like mine and Torquepower, is that a family-business mentality keeps people caring better than elsewhere.
 
We don’t look for someone to blame, we do think about things. We become aware of an issue, we fix it, and we ensure it doesn’t happen again.”
“What I like most about Torquepower, is that we really do support each other and communicate and work together for good solutions. Everyone here has looked after me very well, by finding diverse tasks for me to do, that fits my experience. It’s great !
Supplier of Genuine Cummins Spare Parts since 1978
Working hard for You – The better we buy, the LESS you pay !
https://www.torquepower.com.au/key-staff-photos/

Torquepower ex-Army Clement is a warehouse hero

Torquepower ex-Army Clement is a warehouse hero. Clement ( Poly) Poland, and his 6 siblings were born in Perth and grew up with an Army Engineer Dad . A mechanical kid, Clement would bush-drive old Falcons and then fix engine parts and panels . He attended Star of the Sea and Colby Catholic Colleges , and left at year 10 to attend TAFE to Fast Track senior subjects so he could join the army.

An Army Reserve member since the year 2000, Clem was a mechanical operator and forklift driver for private companies, and joined the ARA ( Australia Regular Army) as a transport driver . He drove Mercedes Benz, Unimog’s, 1980 Mack 3 axle R series , Mann and Fleetliner trucks, and learnt Bulk Fuel operations and dangerous goods.

Overseas in Iraq in 2006 and 2007, Clement was a protection party driver on the huge Taleel US Army Base for the Tour de Force troop entertainment and morale group . Other duties included driving 13,000 litre diesel fuel tankers distances in Iraq to refuel army units outside the base. Ferrying fuel through “Ambush Alley” kept things interesting, and he enjoyed the camaraderie and mateship.

In the years following, Clement was posted in Sydney, and his first daughter born in 2008. He made a family decision and left the Army in 2009, but stayed in the Reserves till 2012. Since then, Clement gathered a raft of skills driving trucks and supervising warehouses for big West Australian companies, and for Hastings Deering Caterpillar in Mount Isa. A family training organisation was grown many times over with Clement as international business development, and sales and operations management.

Now as Torquepower Warehouse Supervisor, Clement enjoys a smaller family business . “ Workers are well looked after and get the resources they need to do a good job. What I like best about Torquepower is that it is a family-oriented close-knit and family-run group. There is an increased desire to get everything correct for the customer, which means for me parts need to be spot on location-wise . My goal is to make the warehouse flow. A very definitive location saves everybody time and improves productivity.”

“As a family, with three awesome kids; we enjoy fishing, four wheel driving and camping. I still like to keep up the Army fitness with running and gym, and the kids keep me fit ! “

Home

 

 

Motorists learn trucking blind spots

Trucking blind spots .  Transport for NSW have done a great job of making an incisive ad, which gets its point over in a smart and believable way. The vast majority of car drivers not only know nothing about the issues around things like trucking blind spots and visibility in a truck. Many car drivers sit cocooned in their own car, with safety systems turned on and do what they want to do and are surprised when other drivers get upset.

Unfortunately, many drivers tune out the trucks moving around them. They assume the truck driver will be able to cope with their actions and their car will remain untouched. However, if the inevitable happens and the truck and car do collide, the damage and risk to life is much more severe than if two cars were involved.

There is also an automatic assumption from everyone outside the trucking community, the truck must be to blame. The media describe any accident which involves a truck, in any way at all, as a ‘truck accident’, assuming guilt from the get-go.

With thanks Diesel News.

Photo credit – treehugger.com

https://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/Driver-guide/Sharing-the-road-with-other-road-users/Heavy-vehicles.aspx

Truck drivers have a certain limitations when it comes to accelerating and slowing down. Heavy vehicles need more room to make turns and their blind spots are much larger than cars. When driving around trucks, keep in mind the following tips:

1. Stay out of the heavy vehicle blind spots

The blind spot diagram, in yellow shade, shows the blind spots are located:

Blind spot around a truck

immediately in front of the truck
beside the truck driver’s door
on the passenger side which runs the length of the truck and extends out three lanes
directly behind the truck.
Blind spot around a truck

Remember: if you cannot see the truck driver’s mirror, the truck driver cannot see you.

2. Travel at a safe following distance

Do not follow a heavy vehicle too closely, as you want to see what is ahead (e.g. debris and other cars). Keep in mind the following when travelling behind a heavy vehicle:

Allow for time to stop safely. The table below shows comparisons of stopping distances for cars and trucks when travelling at the same speeds.

Vehicle Speed Stopping distance (metres)

Car     Truck
60km/h 73      83
70km/h 91      105
80km/h 111    130
90km/h 133    156
100km/h 157  185

If driving in weather conditions such as the wind and rain always leave more than the recommended following distance.

www.torquepower.com.au   We’re for safety.

 

Workshop Air Compressor

Used WORKSHOP AIR COMPRESSOR Now $800 ONO

For sale – in very good condition and good working order. We purchased it new in 2013. Current recommended retail price is around $2,600. It works well but was undersized for our workshop, so we have  recently upgraded.

Specifications; 

  • Pilot K25/21 Industrial 147L 5.5HP 3 Phase Industrial Air Compressor
  • Model: K25/21 Industrial
  • Purchased new 2013
  • Now $800 ONO

Contact ; 

  • Call Andrew Lawrence to organise inspection 0732778277, or see us at 170 Beatty Road, ARCHERFIELD
  • www.torquepower.com

Design; 

The Three Phase Industrial” series is Pilot Air’s premium cast iron range of air compressors suitable for heavy duty industrial use.

Reliability;

The “Three Phase Industrial” Series has high quality and oversized componentry to give the air compressor longer, trouble free life with less wear and tear.

Features;

Features include T.E.F.C. 415V/50HZ (Three phase) motors on all models with overload protection. Models K25 through K100 are two stage compressors and offer aftercooler and intercooler design to increase efficiency and provide higher pressure capabilities. All Receivers are AS1210 approved

 

 

Govt approves almost $20M Landsborough Hwy upgrade

The Australian Government will deliver almost $20 million to upgrade and widen 24.8 kilometres of the Landsborough Highway, north of Longreach, Queensland.

Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester said the project aims to improve safety for road users between Longreach and Winton on the highway.

“The Landsborough Highway is the main north-south route serving western Queensland, and I’ve seen for myself the poor condition of sections between Longreach and Winton, with an ageing surface and a number of safety issues,” Mr Chester said.

“The Australian Government’s commitment to addressing these issues is just one way Queensland will reap the benefits of our record $75 billion investment in infrastructure nationwide, which is aimed squarely at helping unlock the potential of our regions in particular.”

Federal Member for Maranoa David Littleproud said the works would support the region’s economy and communities.

“These upgrades are an investment in the productivity and prosperity of western Queensland communities by building stronger road surfaces, wider lanes and better flood immunity—particularly at Dingo Creek and other low-level crossings,” Mr Littleproud said.

“Freight traffic is forecast to double on this route, which makes these works critical to the future success of the grazing and resources industries and the safe and efficient movement of freight.

“The industries of northern Australia, including those in western Queensland, contribute billions to our national economy, and investing in these key arterial roads means they’ll be able to continue developing—creating jobs in our regions and cities, and fostering new and emerging industries for generations to come.

Works are expected to be completed on the joint Australian and Queensland government-funding project by mid-2020.

With thanks, Roads and Infrastructure Australia
Photo Credit – bouygues-construction.com.au

www.torquepower.com.au

$64.8 million Perth interchange project..

Industry has been invited to express interest in $64.8 million Perth interchange project – the third and final upgrade to Wanneroo Road in Perth’s north – the Wanneroo Road-Ocean Reef Road interchange project

 The works will require design and construction of a bridge at the Wanneroo Road and Ocean Reef Road intersection, traffic signalised on and off ramps, drainage improvements and the realignment of paths and pedestrian crossing points.

The project forms part of the $2.3 billion Federal-State infrastructure package, which supports 17 new projects around Western Australia.

The previous works on Wanneroo Road include the widening of Wanneroo Road to Flynn Drive, which is under construction, and the upgrade of the Wanneroo Road and Joondalup Drive intersection, which is currently in the planning phase.

Western Australian Minister for Transport Rita Saffioti said the three upgrades to Wanneroo Road will be integral to the growing northern suburbs communities. 

“Traffic volumes on both Wanneroo and Ocean Reef Roads are expected to grow rapidly as Perth’s northern suburbs continue expanding,” Ms. Saffioti said.

“Upgrading the intersection will relieve pressure on the existing road network and create more efficiency, which in turn, will support economic activity in the area.

“These Wanneroo Road upgrades, along with the METRONET rail extension to Yanchep, will ensure the northern suburbs will have the right transport infrastructure to match its growth.” 

Construction on the project is expected to begin in late 2018, with completion due in late 2019.

With thanks , Road & Infrastructure Australia. Photo credit – www.plantminer.com.au  and Main Roads WA

www.torquepower.com.au

 

CUMMINS QSK95 LOCOMOTIVE delivers 201 kph

ATLANTA – Cummins Inc. announced that its Cummins QSK95 locomotive engine is in active service installed in Siemens® Charger locomotives in California, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri and Wisconsin.

As displayed at APTA Expo (Booth 1933), the QSK95 uses integrated Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) after-treatment to meet Tier 4 emissions. Combined with Cummins latest-generation Modular Common Rail fuel system (MCR) and turbocharging, it delivers 4400 hp (3281 kW), the highest output of any 16-cylinder high-speed diesel. It enables locomotives to reach top speeds of over 125 mph (201 kmh).

“Versus medium-speed engines, the QSK95 delivers unmatched fuel efficiency and responsiveness with ultra-low emissions and reduced noise, all in a smaller footprint. It supports a 16 percent improvement in fuel efficiency over the non-Tier 4 locomotives that the Charger will replace. The emissions improvement is around 90 percent,” said Melina Kennedy, Executive Director of Cummins Rail Business.

The Charger locomotives, built by Siemens in Sacramento, California, are the first high-speed passenger locomotives to receive Tier 4 emissions certification from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). They are Buy America compliant, using a diverse base of U.S. suppliers including Cummins.

The lighter-weight design enables improved efficiency as well as less maintenance for both the locomotive and the railway infrastructure. Cummins high-speed QSK95 engine is 30-50 percent lighter and smaller than an equivalent traditional medium-speed engine. The locomotive has a fuel capacity of 2,200 gallons and is three times more efficient per passenger than comparable two-person car travel.

Locomotives are currently operating from hubs in Oakland and Chicago. Brightline’s passenger rail service, connecting to South Florida and later on to Orlando, will operate from West Palm Beach. In 2018, there will be a further hub in Baltimore. The locomotives are being supported by close collaboration from Siemens and the local Cummins distributors to ensure high levels of equipment uptime.

“To date, we have delivered 70 out of the 80 engines initially ordered. Based on the positive feedback so far, we expect demand to continue as more projects come on-line,” added Kennedy.

Picture and content credit – www.cumminsengines.com

www.torquepower.com